COMMERCIALS

 

Running Time: 1 mins.
Vault: COMMERCIALS

Features the "Ajax Pixies" -- Three energetic pixies who cavorted about kitchens and bathrooms cleaning dirty surfaces with Ajax Cleanser. Created by the Sherman & Marguette Advertising Agency for the Colgate-Palmolive Company, these three pointy-eared personalities were TV's first animated commercial mascots. Their Ajax Cleanser commercial also introduced TVs first jingle 'You'll stop paying the elbow tax, when you start cleaning with Ajax.' The pixies (a fat, a thin and a tall pixie all under three-inches in height) interacted with live-action shots and piped such scripted lines as 'Foams as it cleans,' 'Cuts grease fast' and 'Floats the dirt right down the drain.' The commercials were accompanied by a bouncy 'Bum, Bum, Bum, Bum Bum' musical score written by Joe Rines. Ajax 'the foaming Cleanser' debuted on television with its three animated pixie mascots in 1948 and continued through the 1950s. Note the voice talent: June Foray (Rocky the Squirrel), Paul Frees (Voice Disneyland's Haunted Mansion), Daws Butler (Yogi Bear).

 

Running Time: 2 mins.
Vault: COMMERCIALS

 

Running Time: 1 mins.
Vault: COMMERCIALS

Meet Chrissy! The amazing doll -- just press her tummy and watch her hair grow down to her toes, turn her belly "button" to roll it all back into the hole in the top of her head.

 

Running Time: 1 mins.
Vault: COMMERCIALS

Why can't this lady clean her horribly stained dentures? Because she isn't using Dentu-Creme of course! Regular toothpaste is too gentle - note small child using (we hope) regular toothpaste. Dentu-Creme: strong enough to clean dentures baked in an oven for four days...

 

Running Time: 1 mins.
Vault: COMMERCIALS

A smug young husband says "Augh! This coffee is criminal!" as he throws a cup of his wife's coffee into a bed of petunias. Then, he obnoxiously berates his wife while sticking his finger in her face saying, "Admit it! Your coffee really is murder!" The wife seeks out a wise old man in the grocery store and pleads, "Papa Eddie, it's my coffee -- it's murder!" Papa Eddie is the male version of Mrs. Olsen, another Folger's coffee pusher. Papa Eddie makes a strange gesture of holding his hands over his head to demonstrate that Folger's coffee is "mountain grown." Problem solved!

 

Running Time: 1 mins.
Vault: COMMERCIALS

The breakfast bliss of Harvey and his wife are shattered when he inexplicably rips into her coffee making ability, makes a veiled threat that he's going to start looking for other women, and then in one of history's great passive-agressive turns delares "well, see you later" and exits dramatically stage left. Of course this outburst is entirely the fault of the wife's poor culinary skills, but once her non-phased friend informs her about instant coffee (as opposed to, say, some counciling) the only rift in their otherwise rock-solid union is closed and the loving couple enjoy a romantic evening in their now completely dark living room.

 

Running Time: 1 mins.
Vault: COMMERCIALS

KOOL "snow fresh filter" menthol cigarettes features "Pengo" the ice skating penguin, followed by a scenes of a flowing icy river then by a suave smoking announcer. As clean as a breath of fesh air!

 

Running Time: 1 mins.
Vault: COMMERCIALS

Animated cigarettes march in military formations to the sound of a marching band. Whoever made this ad still had World War II on the brain. The cigarettes are described as "so round, so firm, so fully packed" and the bellicose announcer promises "deep down smoking enjoyment." Smokers of Lucky Strike will be deep down, all right--six feet under.

 

Running Time: 1 mins.
Vault: COMMERCIALS

Dancing cigarettes!

 

Cast: Frank Sinatra, Kay Kaiser
Running Time: 9 mins.
Vault: COMMERCIALS

This is a very typical piece of the day. The sponsor, this time Lucky Strike would have Sinatra on contract as it was commonplace in that day for the sponsor to underwrite the star's radio program. In return the star would normally do odd bits of advertising work, sometimes this would be on radio or in the form of a short. Rather than a sell-out to the highest bidder it was an industry standard at the time.

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